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Exxopolis is coming to Tauranga

In October 2015 the Tauranga Arts Festival is thrilled to be bringing a major international experience – Exxopolis, the Luminarium.

A large inflatable structure made of coloured PVC, each Luminarium is an architectural wonderland of light and colour. It is a is a dazzling maze of winding paths and soaring domes where Archimedean solids, Gothic cathedrals  and Islamic domes meld into an inspiring mix of design and engineering. 

This international sensation has enchanted over 2 million people around the world and is enjoyed by the broadest cross section of people. The inclusiveness of the luminarium experience in terms of accessibility to all ages and abilities means that the whole community can participate.

The monumental forms are strikingly eye-catching and act as a magnet to draw in a large number of visitors. The Luminarium creates a must-see destination in the cities it visits, and will be part of the Tauranga Arts Festival hub and sited on the Tauranga waterfront.

Tauranga Arts Festival launches its full programme of performing and visual arts from New Zealand and around the world on 12 August. Full details will online and tickets on sale from 13 August at www.taurangafestival.co.nz

About Exxopolis
Exxopolis is a Luminaruim. Since 1992 luminaria have been shown in over 500 exhibitions in 38 countries. From Berlin to Brooklyn, Hong Kong to Hawaii, Taipei to Te Aviv, Sao Paolo to the Sydney Opera House , the monumental walk-in sculptures have enchanted audiences of over 2 million people from around the world.

Each Luminarium is an architectural wonderland of light and colour. A large inflatable structure it is made of coloured PVC and is shaped into domes rising up to 10m high with up to 30 pods interconnected by tunnels. It is a is a dazzling maze of winding paths and soaring domes where Archimedean solids, Gothic cathedrals  and Islamic domes meld into an inspiring mix of design and engineering. Designed to generate a sense of wonder at the beauty of light and colour, it typically occupies a space of 1000 m2. 

 

So what will visitors experience?
Visitors remove their shoes before entering an airlock. Once inside they can wander freely or just lay back and enjoy the ambience of the structure. The first reaction is often one of delight at the unexpected beauty of the light. The radiance of the daylight transmitted by the coloured PVC of the luminarium is surprising in its luminosity and makes a direct impact on the senses.

Through labyrinthine tunnels and cavernous domes, visitors move in a medium of saturated and subtle hues. Vivid reflections of liquid colour spill across the curved walls creating a world apart from the normal and everyday. Visitors are excited to discover how different colours blend or resonate; how they transform faces and clothing.  Some  explore,  following  their  maps  through  the  maze  immersing  themselves  in  radiant colour.

No two visits to a structure are alike as the atmosphere inside alters according to changing weather and changing light outside. The experience is also affected by how the public inhabits the luminarium.

Visitors try to put their experience into words – comparing the experience to like walking through a stained glass window,  like a futuristic space station, or like inside a gigantic strange breathing organic but comforting creature.


 

Tauranga Arts Festival launches its full programme of performing and visual arts from New Zealand and around the world on 12 August.

Full details will online and tickets on sale from 13 August at www.taurangafestival.co.nz